To Fload, or Not to Fload?

Maintenance issues you will want to know.

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jdconnel
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Location: Oak Creek, WI
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To Fload, or Not to Fload?

Post by jdconnel »

So after reading some of the previous posts, I am still confused.
My boat had been stored since (I think) 2002.
It's a 1957 Sea Coaster "Model 477” (That’s for helping I.D.!)

The last time it was out, the owner said there was a little leaking near the transom on the bottom, but once it soaked up, everything was fine.


I know this is not correct, and want to know what steps I should take to correct this.
I assume, tightening the nuts inside, near the areas of concern. (Sorry if I’m butchering any terminology here. This is the fist boat, wooden or other I’ve ever owned).
I don’t know which ones to tighten, or if there’s a methodology to this.
Also, once this is done, I know caulking something is in order. Does this involve me removing lumber, or do I caulk the haul as is, and repaint when finished? Also can I perform this in the winter in my garage, or do I need a certain climate before I can proceed?
And lastly, the biggest back and forth question is flooding the interior.
Should I do this to find out where it’s leaking, and to help the lumber soak before I launch in spring? Or should I just do what I can and hope for the best? I assume this would be a horrible idea in winter due to the freezing aspect.

I know there’s a lot of questions. I probably should break these into multiple posts.
Thanks in advance.
-James
john
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Post by john »

In a perfect world a lapstrake boat should not leak any water, they should not require swelling.

Just depends on how perfect you want it to be.

Any water leaks are a sign of sealant failure and loose fastening.

Most boats leak, the more the leak the more the chance of terminal rot, especially if not completely dried out after use.

The best way is complete disassembly, and reassembly with new sealant and new fastening. An act of love not economics.

Pictures of my boat can be seen at www.aerialimaging.net/john

Boat looked good when I purchased it, just leaked. After disassemble, reassembly with new sealant and fastening, zero leaks after 2 1/2 years, 100 hours and 7000 miles of trailering.
a j r
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Post by a j r »

James,

Try to pinpoint where she is leaking and fix that area. A very typical place for boats such as these to leak is at the outer keel. The latest issue of "The Thompson Dockside" has a step-by-step article about how to remove the outer keel and recaulk under it and reattch it. Bacome a subscriber and request starting with that issue.

Correct, don't fill the boat with water and let it freeze.

By the way it is h-u-l-l NOT h-a-u-l.

Andreas
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jdconnel
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Location: Oak Creek, WI
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Post by jdconnel »

Thanks John. Sounds like a large undertaking, but well worth it.
on average, what is the restoration cost / hours for such a project? Want to make sure to budget accordingly when I do it right.
I was thinking of getting 2 hoists for my garage, and suspending the boat so that I could have an easier time working underneath of it for this type of job.

AJR, is that subscription part of this forum?
Not that I mind spending money, just seems foolish to buy something I can get online already :) At least that's why I joined the forum.
I tried to get a free sample, but the site is not well designed and won't let me submit the form.
I assume that's why this new format was made up... which does look a LOT better btw.

Thanks guys for the advice so far.
Looks like the smart thing to do is take it out once to see just how bad things are, then make the effort to reseal correctly for year of future enjoyment. I also assume this is NOT a winter job in WI. Prob need temps at 50+ for things to dry correctly.

P.S. Regarding "Hull"...I still think Word needs an intent checker!
a j r
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Post by a j r »

There is a subscription fee for "The Thompson Dockside" newsletter. You have to check with the editor publiser Miles Kapper on the cost. I assume his contact information is somewhere on this site.
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john
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Post by john »

Jd

Seems like winter in Wis would be easier on you than Texas Summer. Get heat in garage and get started.

Don't mess around with lifting, just strip and flip hull. Will make life a lot easier.

I did a concentrated effort and took 3 months mostly all weekend starting at about 4am and ending about 5 or 6pm. Painting took another 2 months, and trying to determine a good way of getting the job done about 3 months of not getting anywhere. Got in a big hurry about May when Summer started to kick in.

Cost cpes about 400, new wood 200, screws about 500, and paint another 300. Did not keep tract per say. Only wood replaced was inner keel and one 1x4x36 on transom.
JoeCB
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Post by JoeCB »

James, the above guidance is, no doubt the right way to do the job. If however you are not ready to tackle a major rebuild, there are a few stop gap ( no pun intended) measures that can be taken. If you can localize the source of the leak all the better. If the leak is at the keel, removing the outer keel and resealing is pretty simple. The outer keel is held on with wood screws covered with wood bungs ( plugs). Remove the keel, clean up the crud and rebed with 3M 5200. If the leak is between planks, a little 5200 will do wonders. From the underside, scrape out the crud and old paint from the corner of the lap joint and squeeze in a thin ( 1/8 - 3/16") bead of 5200. You can also try to tighten up any near by screws (#6 FH machine screw and nuts). Paint over the sealer and you will be surprised at how much tighter the boat will be. This is a temporary fix, but should hold up for a couple of years.
Joe
thegammas
Posts: 565
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2006 2:10 pm
Location: Wilmington, Delaware. peterstransky@verizon.net - put wooden boat in the subject

Since we are on the subject, what of tattered plywood?

Post by thegammas »

At the extreme stern of my 1962 Custom Sea Lancer (Thanks Andreas!) under the transom, the plywood bottom has some chips out of it. I'd doscribe it as 'frayed'. Is there a product that I can use to properly and effectively patch it? Something akin to Bondo on a car?

I too have some leakes. I discovered them when cleaning out the boat with a hose when I first got it. Coming from under the outer keel. Bummer.
Peter Stransky
1962 Cortland Custom Sea Lancer
Wilmington, Delaware
jdconnel
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Location: Oak Creek, WI
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Post by jdconnel »

Does anyone have an extra copy of "The Thompson Dockside" with the step-by-step article I could get a copy of?
I recieved the sample article, and wasn't really that impressed. for $20 I felt I could spend my money better elsewhere.

Also, if anyone has any good book recomendations for restorations. I can always hit the library up, and I'm sure there's material out there to be had.

It lokos like the smart move for this winter is to work on the mechanical side of things. Test the boat in the water during the summer, and plot out my plans for a decent restore next winter when I have more information.

Feel free to PM me about the newsletter.
Thanks
txcaptdan
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Post by txcaptdan »

Peter, As to nicks, dings and gouges in your hull, I have been using a product called Formula 27 or West Marine sells same material under their name as Marine filler putty. You work similar to bondo add small amount of hardner to glob of putty and apply hardens fast and is easy to sand as opposed to epoxy with filler.
I have used this product above and below water line with good results. make sure you prep area correctly by sanding to clean surface.
Good Luck
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Dan Stober
1965 20' Cruisers Inc. 570 Seacamper
1962 20' Cruisers Inc. 502
1963 16' Cruisers Inc. 202 Seafarer
Weatherford, Texas
a j r
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Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2006 3:09 pm

Post by a j r »

a j r wrote:James,

Try to pinpoint where she is leaking and fix that area. A very typical place for boats such as these to leak is at the outer keel. The latest issue of "The Thompson Dockside" has a step-by-step article about how to remove the outer keel and recaulk under it and reattch it. Bacome a subscriber and request starting with that issue.

Correct, don't fill the boat with water and let it freeze.

By the way it is h-u-l-l NOT h-a-u-l.

Andreas
I lied, it isn't the "Thompson Dockside" where this article appears, it is "The BoatHouse" magazine, www.acbs-bslol.com (it's not on the website). I had a ditzy moment. I am, by the way, a true blond and my colours show thru once in a while!

Andreas
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kevx
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Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:32 pm
Location: Spring Hill, FL

Post by kevx »

Andreas's article on repairing a leaky lapstreak at the outer keel is posted free online at the boathouse. You can download it here.

http://www.acbs-bslol.com/RestorationNo ... strake.pdf

Many more great restoration articles can be found on the same page here:

http://www.acbs-bslol.com/RestorationNotebook.htm
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